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The most obvious conclusion would be that the Book of Daniel was written at the time of the profanation of the Temple by Antiochus IV, during the Maccabean revolt which that sacrilege provoked.

That would explain why the author is not very precise about sixth century events, why he is so precise about the time of Antiochus, and why he was never counted among the prophets.

These general prediction become much more detailed and specific when he predicts the conquest of the king of the south by a king of the north who "shall do as neither his fathers nor his father's fathers have done, scattering among them plunder, spoil, and goods" (). This king is "predicted" to cause the sacrifices of the Temple to cease ()and to set up a "desolating sacrilege" in the Temple () This can be non other than Antiochus IV Epiphanes, the Seleucid ruler of Babylon who profaned the Jerusalem Temple in 167 BCE and set up a statue of Zeus with whom he identified himself.

Unfortunately, after these remarkably accurate "predictions" Daniel goes awry at () when he predicts that this king will be attacked by the king of the south etc. Finally, and of considerable significance, is the fact that the Book of Daniel was never grouped with the Hebrew Nevi'im (the Prophets) but has always belonged to the Ketuvim (the writings).

How could the author of the Book of Daniel make such an error if he lived and wrote at the time indicated?

The author of the Book of Daniel seems to place the rule of Cyrus after that of Darius, again an inexplicable error for an author contemporary with these events.

Thirdly, the whole genre of Apocalyptic literature which Daniel represents only developed during the period of crisis and persecution under Antiochus.

The few examples of Apocalyptic in the Old Testament are all late, and the popularity of Apocalyptic in the New Testament is indication that it was a relatively new and popular literary form around the time of Jesus.

This is too coincidental to be accidental and too contrived to be miraculous.

He tells of "a mighty king who shall arise and rule with great dominion" who can be recognized as Alexander (336 - 323 BCE, (11:3).

He "predicts" the division of the Greek empire after Alexander's death and the wars between the Ptolemies who rule in Egypt (the "kings of the south") and the Seleucids who rule in Babylon (the "kings of the north").

Fourth the predictions given by Daniel in the form of the interpretation of dreams and visions are remarkably accurate up to a point. These can readily be identified as the Babylonian, the Persian, the Greek and the divided Greek empire (after the death of Alexander the Great).

He continues to tell the "future" with great accuracy.

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